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Archive All Articles 2024

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  • Pharmacology

    Happy Mums, Healthy Babies

    One in 10 women suffer from depression during pregnancy. The illness often goes untreated and can have negative effects on the child. Now, in a large-scale international project, UZH researchers are analyzing the biological interactions at play and seeking treatment methods that are safe for mother and child.
  • Innovative Teaching Projects – Part 6: International

    Across Europe in Three Years

    The Una Europa joint Bachelor’s degree program in European studies enables students to study at up to three universities in Europe. UZH will take part in this unique study program starting in 2025.
  • Ethnology

    New Dawn in the Land of Seven Rivers

    Market economy replaces socialism: in the booming seven rivers region of Kazakhstan, ethnologist Peter Finke is examining how new social structures and ownership conditions are emerging amid legal uncertainty and loss of trust.
  • UZH Delegation in Washington D.C.

    On a Mission for Biodiversity Partnerships

    US institutions are among UZH’s most important partners in research and development. To foster academic exchange, the UZH President visited important cooperation partners with a group of scientists. The thematic focus was on the areas of global change and biodiversity.
  • Institute for Eastern European Studies

    “Cultural war on the West”

    A new institute is being established at UZH to gain a better historical, political and cultural understanding of Eastern Europe. Slavonic studies scholar Sylvia Sasse and historian Jeronim Perović talk about the “Russian world” and the war in Ukraine and its impact.
  • Loans for small businesses

    Closing the Microcredit Gender Gap in Ghana

    Small loans can help people establish and expand their small businesses. A field study in Ghana has now revealed that men ask for and receive more money from microcredit companies than women. However, if women are better informed, they are more likely to apply for higher amounts.
  • Symposium on stem cells

    Strengthening Ties with Japan

    UZH and Kyoto University work together closely in the field of stem cell research. As part of this collaboration, a high-level conference is taking place in Zurich this week with researchers from both countries. The event was organized by stem cell researcher Melanie Generali.
  • Gender Medicine

    The Right Medicine for Women and Men

    Many illnesses have sex- and gender-specific causes and symptoms, many of which have received little research attention thus far. That, however, is about to change. UZH has established the first professorial chair in gender medicine in Switzerland to advance research in this field.
  • New UZH Magazin

    Healthy Women, Healthy Men

    Many diseases manifest differently in women and men. The symptoms for heart disease, stroke, depression and cancer can look very different depending on your sex. Researchers in the field of gender medicine are looking into these gender-specific differences and developing the right therapies. The new UZH Magazin shines a light on the significance of this field.
  • IceAgeCam

    Experience Ice Ages and Climate Change Up Close

    The new IceAgeCam installation on Felsenegg gives an impressive demonstration of the human influence on climate change. Visitors can immerse themselves in an interactive experience of the changing glacial landscapes. It is the result of an interdisciplinary project involving researchers from UZH, the University of Lausanne and the Zurich University of the Arts.
  • New Department

    University Steps up Data Science

    UZH is responding to the rise of data science by establishing the Department of Mathematical Modeling and Machine Learning. DM3L for short, it combines UZH’s strong basic research in mathematics with practical applications and will offer a new study program from fall 2025. Here are four examples.
  • Interim Use

    Irchel Campus to Host High Schools

    This summer, Kantonsschule Zürich Nord will relocate to two renovated buildings on Irchel Campus, creating a coexistence of university and high school that is unique in Switzerland. This move will enable joint projects but also poses certain challenges. Members of the UZH community had the opportunity to learn more and ask questions at a town hall meeting.
  • Cancer medicine

    An Immunotherapy to Overcome Resistant Leukemia

    Researchers at UZH and USZ have discovered why a specific mutation makes the cancer cells of an aggressive type of blood cancer resistant to CAR T-cell therapy. They also show that a concomitant pharmacotherapy or genetically improved CAR T-cells makes the immune therapy effective again.
  • Innovative Teaching Projects – Part 5: Research-Based

    Teaching Turned Upside Down

    In the “City without Papers” project, students collaboratively investigate undocumented migrants’ precarious living conditions. This new type of teaching format is devoted to addressing current questions in urban studies research and in the process challenges traditional roles in science and teaching.
  • Panel Discussion «Studying and Working with Disabilities»

    Studying without Barriers

    In a panel discussion at UZH on the topic of studying and working with disabilities, the kinds of everyday difficulties disabled students face were brought out in the open. The Executive Board of the University – represented by Vice President Gabriele Siegert – promised that specific measures would be implemented quickly.
  • Paleontology

    Ancient Giant Dolphin Discovered in the Amazon

    Measuring between 3 to 3.5 meters, 16 million years old: Paleontologists from the University of Zurich have announced the discovery of a new species of freshwater dolphin in the Peruvian Amazon region. Surprisingly, its closest living relatives can be found in the river dolphins of South Asia.
  • Initiative Sustainable Finance

    Building Bridges

    The Department of Finance at the University of Zurich has launched the "Initiative in Sustainable Finance". Its aim is to become a leading global center for research in this area and to promote dialogue between science, business, politics, and society.
  • University museums / exhibitions

    UZH Opens New Natural History Museum with Four Dinosaurs

    The new Natural History Museum of the University of Zurich brings together zoology, paleontology, anthropology and botany under the same roof. The museum opens with four new dinosaur skeletons and various other additions that shine a light on how evolution and biodiversity have shaped life on our planet.
  • School in Ghana

    Increasing Trust and Improving School Grades

    Mistrust between ethnic groups is a major problem for many African countries. Economist David Yanagizawa-Drott runs a project in Ghana that seeks to build up trust among ethnic groups and at the same time improve school teaching.
  • International Rankings

    UZH to No Longer Provide Data for THE Ranking

    The University of Zurich has decided to withdraw from the Times Higher Education World University Ranking. The ranking is not able to reflect the wide range of activities in teaching and research undertaken by universities.
  • Citizen Science Zurich

    A Safe Space for Delicate Topics

    The Seed Grants of the Citizen Science Zurich initiative support a range of pilot projects that bring together UZH researchers and members of the public. One such project, Hair SALON, aims to provide women in Lesotho with crucial sexual and reproductive health services in hair salons.
  • INTeRCePT Research Project

    Better Prognosis for Blood Cancers

    Being handed a diagnosis of cancer often turns people’s lives upside down. When the cancer is blood cancer, the impact is even more dramatic. Although the chances of recovery have improved greatly in recent years, recurrences are still relatively common. A research team led by Thorsten Zenz is working on reducing the risk of relapse.
  • Scientific Research Stations

    Researching in the Wild

    UZH’s Faculty of Science operates research stations in far-flung places, where researchers analyze the effects of climate change or observe mountain chimps and meerkats in their natural environment, among other things. Five of these stations are presented below.
  • Innovative Teaching Projects – Part 4: Transdisciplinary

    Ready for the World of Work?

    In the new Master’s minor program in Digital Skills, launching at UZH in fall 2024, students will not only acquire technical affinity, but will also work with researchers on pressing questions surrounding the digital transformation. This new concept prepares students – and the university itself – to meet the challenges of the future.
  • Neuroscience

    Live Music Emotionally Moves Us More than Streamed Music

    A study has found that live performances trigger a stronger emotional response than listening to music from a device. Concerts connect performers with their audience, which may also have to do with evolutionary factors.
  • Astronomy

    Earth as a test object

    If a space telescope like LIFE were to observe planet Earth from a distance of around 30 light years, it would find signs of a temperate, habitable world. Physicists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich reached this conclusion with the help of observations of our own planet.
  • mTORUS

    Helpful Viruses

    Researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have rediscovered a long-neglected treatment for urinary tract infections – bacteriophages. These viruses can be used to fight bacterial infections without the side effects caused by antibiotics. However, approval is still a long way off.
  • Medicine

    Arterial Connections Improve Treatment Outcomes Following Stroke

    Blood vessels that cross-connect adjacent arterial trees regulate blood flow to the brain in stroke patients. These vessels prevent brain hemorrhage following treatment to remove blood clots. They play a crucial role in the recovery of stroke patients.
  • Behavioral economics

    Combination of Group Competition and Repeated Interactions Promotes Cooperation

    How did cooperative behavior prevail in human evolution? Researchers from the Universities of Zurich, Lausanne and Konstanz have challenged two prevailing explanations – repeated interactions on the one hand or group competition on the other. Instead, both mechanisms synergistically contribute to fostering cooperation effectively.
  • Biomedicine

    Cracking the Code of Neurodegeneration

    Scientists at UZH have developed an innovative neural cell culture model, shedding light on the intricate mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Their research revealed a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
  • Collegium Helveticum

    Tax History

    Historian Madeline Woker is conducting research into tax (in)justice as a fellow at the Collegium Helveticum. Last Friday, she organised a panel discussion with the economist Gabriel Zucman, who has published the “Global Tax Evasion Report 2024”.
  • UZH Life

    Bribery and Brutality

    Oliver Diggelmann has written about the upheavals in post-socialist Hungary, Felix Uhlmann about the logic of senseless violence. Both UZH legal scholars published a novel last year, which places them within a long tradition of writers with legal backgrounds.
  • One Health

    Rabid Dogs in Uganda

    Every year, many people in Uganda die from rabies after being bitten by a dog. Veterinary epidemiologist Sonja Hartnack is working together with Makerere University in Uganda on ways to effectively combat the deadly virus.
  • Plant science

    Asexual Propagation of Crop Plants Gets Closer

    When the female gametes in plants become fertilized, a signal from the sperm activates cell division, leading to the formation of new plant seeds. This activation can also be deliberately triggered without fertilization, which opens up new avenues for the asexual propagation of crop plants.
  • FAN Award

    Heart Defects, the World of Work, and Algorithms

    Melanie Ehrler, Simon Walo and Regina Weder are being honored with this year’s FAN Awards in recognition of their outstanding research work. Their three topics of research are the development of children with heart defects, the future of work, and the legal conditions for the use of AI in public administration.
  • Innovative Teaching Projects – Part 3: Engaging

    From Learners to Co-Creators

    Teaching staff at UZH are developing an online tool that prompts students to come up with possible exam questions based on their teaching materials. This helps students consolidate what they have learned and also supports teaching staff in creating their exams.
  • World Health Organization WHO

    On such a full sea

    The University of Zurich maintains close ties with the World Health Organization. In a speech at UZH last week, the WHO’s chief scientist Sir Jeremy Farrar made an appeal for more social cohesion. For Farrar, universities have an important role to play here.
  • Biomedical Technology

    Visualizing Multiple Sclerosis with a New MRI Procedure

    The loss of myelin sheaths in the brain is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis. Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have now developed an MRI method that maps the condition of this nerve insulation layer more accurately than before.
  • Public Lecture Series

    Religion, Reproduction and Crises

    From digitalization of religious practices through ethical questions around human reproduction to strategies for navigating crises or the challenges of sustainable development – the new public lecture series at UZH take an interdisciplinary deep dive into important issues of the day.
  • Psychiatric diseases

    Stress Influences Brain and Psyche Via Immune System

    Under chronic stress, a particular enzyme found in cells of the immune system enters the brain. In mice, it causes them to withdraw and avoid social contact. This new connection between body and mind in stress-related mental illness could lead to new treatments for depression.
  • Informatics

    Mining Coins

    Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin were created to circumvent the monopoly on money held by nation states and central banks. The digital currencies were to function more democratically and be widely disseminated. But the opposite has happened, blockchain researcher Claudio Tessone notes.
  • Chinese Studies

    Utopias Made in China

    Chinese science fiction is thriving, with Mark Zuckerberg and Barack Obama counting themselves as fans. The Chinese government has recognized the genre’s potential and is ramping up the creation of utopias – which is impacting the country’s digital culture.
  • Virology

    Alexandra Trkola Awarded US$3 Million Grant

    The renowned virologist from the University of Zurich receives the major award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for vaccine studies in well-studied groups of people living with HIV in Switzerland and South Africa.
  • Brain research

    Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand

    Specialized cells in the brain respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand. If this process is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age – resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.
  • TRANSFORM

    Eastern Europe and Bioimaging

    UZH is pooling its research expertise in a variety of fields, including Eastern European studies and bioimage analysis. A new interdisciplinary institute for Eastern European studies and the recently established BioVisionCenter were made possible thanks to seed funding from the university’s TRANSFORM program.
  • Una.Lecture

    University Autonomy is a Valuable Asset

    At Una Europa’s first public discussion in Switzerland, the leaders of the universities of Zurich, Leiden and Edinburgh were all in agreement: the academic, organizational and financial independence of universities must be fiercely defended against attempts to exert external influence.
  • Sociology

    Young People from Poorer Families Make Fewer Friends

    A new study has found that children growing up in low-income families have fewer opportunities to make friends and to socially integrate at school. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University of Stockholm examined data from over 200 school classes in Sweden and reached this conclusion.
  • Paediatrics

    Sepsis in Children: Improved Diagnosis Thanks to New Global Criteria

    Diagnosis of sepsis in children has been improved based on new research findings. An international research team harnessed artificial intelligence to analyze data from over 3.5 million children suffering from this life-threatening disease.
  • Space Research

    Green Light for LISA

    The ESA’s most expensive and complex mission, the LISA space antenna, has reached a major milestone: it has passed the stage of intensive testing by experts in the Mission Adoption Review process. Project member Professor Philippe Jetzer of UZH explains why this is such a significant step for the LISA consortium.
  • alliance of universities

    Una Europa Boosts European Cooperation

    Una Europa is a unique alliance of 11 European research universities, including UZH. We asked Vice President Gabriele Siegert about how joining the alliance in 2022 has benefited research at UZH and its international outlook.
  • Swissnex China & UZH

    Anthropocentric Arrogance

    The Museum of Contemporary Art in Shanghai presents the immersive exhibition "Mirror of Nature: Biodiversity through the Lens of Technology and Art" at its pavilion in People's Park. Organized by the UZH in collaboration with Swissnex in China, the exhibition is a transdisciplinary exploration of global biodiversity loss through art and science.
  • Medicine

    Complement System Causes Cell Damage in Long Covid

    Long Covid patients suffer from chronic symptoms such as fatigue or shortness of breath. This is to some extent due to a part of our immune system, the complement system. UZH researchers identified a pattern in the blood proteins for better diagnoses and more targeted treatments.
  • Innovative Teaching Projects – Part 2: Goal-Oriented

    A New Era in Medical Training

    The medical program at UZH is being given a fundamental overhaul: the development of clinical thinking and practical skills is to be prioritized over top-down teaching of theory.
  • Laboratory Animals

    Less Stress, Better Research

    Urs Meyer, professor at the Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology at UZH, and his team have developed a new method of orally administering pharmaceutical substances to mice. The new method benefits both the animals and the researchers. The method will now be rolled out more widely as part of the National Research Programme 79, “Advancing 3R”.
  • Global Health

    “We can only solve problems together”

    Infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance spread around the world via trade and travel routes. Together with partners in India and Uganda, the infectious diseases specialist Jan Fehr is looking for solutions to global health problems.
  • World Economic Forum

    When the Private Becomes Public

    Next week, the elite of science and politics will meet at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos to talk about current global challenges. Digitalization and data protection are high on the agenda. UZH law scholar Adrian Künzler is a consultant and member of the WEF Global Future Council on the Future of Metaverse.
  • UZH in the Media

    Top Ten Media Releases 2023

    Stories about research at UZH resonated all over the world, with artificial intelligence (AI) proving a particularly popular topic in 2023. The greatest global media response, however, was triggered by the study on abuse in the Catholic Church.
  • Zurich’s Senior Citizens University UZH3

    Seeing the World Anew

    Zurich’s Senior Citizens University UZH3 exercises the brain cells of adults over sixty. Combined with sport and social activities, lifelong learning is a health asset in people’s later years. Research carried out by UZH psychologist Burcu Demiray also backs this up.
  • UZH Spin-Offs, Annual Round-Up

    From Lab to Market

    In the last year, eight new spin-offs were created at the University of Zurich to bring research-based ideas to market readiness. The new companies are developing innovative approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, lead poisoning, blood cancer and endometriosis, the improvement of spinal surgery, better diagnostics in oral health, and simplification of satellite data analysis.
  • Evolutionary medicine

    Early Primates Likely Lived in Pairs

    Primate social organization is more flexible than previously assumed. According to a new study led by UZH, the first primates probably lived in pairs, while only around 15 percent of individuals were solitary.

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