Archive Arts and Social Sciences: 20 newest articles

  • Film Studies

    Utopian Cinema

    Movies such as Blade Runner paint a grim picture of the future. Positive utopias, hardly ever seen in entertainment cinema, have found a home in documentaries. Film studies scholar Simon Spiegel tells us why. More …

  • Japanese Studies

    Water Clocks and Eternity

    Medieval Japan wasn’t a pre-modern timeless paradise, says Raji C. Steineck. The Japanese studies scholar is examining the nature of time and researching how time is perceived in the land of the rising sun. More …

  • Philosophy

    “The freedom of thought appealed to me”

    The first-ever Zurich Philosophy Festival kicks off next week. The theme: “Me, Me, Me.” We spoke to the man behind the festival, UZH philosophy student Urs Siegfried. More …

  • Social Policy

    “Investment instead of insurance”

    Polarization in Swiss politics makes the country less able to reform, says political scientist Silja Häusermann. She wants to see a welfare state that helps people to stay in the employment market. More …

  • History

    Cinema and Scandal

    UZH historian Martin Bürgin researches films that caused an uproar – and he is bringing them back to the big screen in a special film series. More …

  • Economics

    The Costs of Having Children

    Well-to-do couples in developed countries are having fewer and fewer children. While this may be good in terms of global overpopulation, it has unsettling consequences for living together. More …

  • History

    The Cradle of Modernity

    Bernd Roeck has written a major book about a period of major importance – the Renaissance. The historian spoke to us about the turning point that laid the foundation for Western modernity. More …

  • Social and Cultural Anthropology

    Under the Myanmar Sun

    Violence against the Rohingya people, a Muslim minority in Myanmar, has thrust the country back into the international spotlight. Anthropologist Georg Winterberger spent time in Myanmar researching the lives of the majority Buddhist population there. More …

  • Psychology

    Speedy Swiss

    The pace of life differs depending on where in the world you are – in Switzerland it is the fastest of anywhere. That could be a good thing, but does it also lead us to work too hard? Why are so many workers suffering from stress and burning out? It doesn’t have to be this way. More …

  • Literature

    Feminism in the Age of Donald Trump

    Twenty-five years after the publication of Elisabeth Bronfen’s groundbreaking work Over Her Dead Body, Bronfen, Judith Butler, and other international stars of the feminist literary scene met at UZH for a symposium marking the book’s anniversary. More …

  • Psychology

    Overcoming Crises

    Why are some people better at coping with emotional stress than others? This is what resilience research wants to find out. An international group of psychologists has now come together to establish common principles for this fledgling field of research. More …

  • Men's studies

    Healthy Optimists

    Psychologist Ulrike Ehlert is looking into what keeps men over 40 healthy, fit, and satisfied. What’s important, she’s found, is an optimistic outlook on life and regular physical exercise. More …

  • Political Science

    “Withdrawing into a shell of nationalism”

    New US president Donald Trump is preaching national egotism, and all over Europe nationalist parties are gaining ground. In this interview political scientist Stefanie Walter explains what this means for the future of world trade and the post-war world order. More …

  • UZH Digital Society Initiative

    "This child is going to make us very proud."

    Prominent figures from business and politics gathered in the main lecture hall to kick off the UZH Digital Society Initiative. It’s designed as a vehicle to enable the University to take a leading role in digital transformation. More …

  • Sociology

    Global Nomads

    So-called transnational mobiles live in more and more places around the globe. For her research, sociologist Claudia Vorheyer has interviewed people who have made being on the move a fundamental way of life. More …

  • Cooperation with Japan

    Technology for Aging

    Last week researchers from Japan and Switzerland met at a workshop in Tokyo to discuss ways modern technology could facilitate healthy aging. The co-organizer of the workshop, UZH gerontologist Mike Martin, talked to us about the background to the meeting. More …

  • Clinical Research Priority Programs

    A Boost for Sleep Research

    A hectic lifestyle has lead to sleep problems and a chronic sleep deficit for many people. Under its Sleep and Health Clinical Research Priority Program (CRPP), the University of Zurich is seeking more effective therapies for sleep disorders and trying to gain a deeper understanding of the functions of sleep. More …

  • Neurosciences

    Teach Them Young

    Learning English can be child’s play for primary school kids, provided the teaching is intensive enough. Neuroscientists are now looking into how learning foreign languages affects the brain. More …

  • Geography

    Babies to Order

    Surrogate mothers dream of a better life, while the prospective parents dream of a happy family. But the people who profit most from this business are the lawyers and the surrogate parenting agencies. More …

  • Ancient Greek Verse Inscription Unearthed

    124 Lines of Hitherto Unknown Poetry and History

    Christian Marek, an expert in ancient history at UZH, has made a sensational discovery. Close to a tomb in Milas in Turkey he found a stone stela inscribed with poetry. At 124 lines, this is the longest classical Greek verse inscription carved in stone that has so far come to light. More …

Arts and Social Sciences:20 newest articlesArchive